As cyber criminals become increasingly sophisticated, digital crime has grown at an alarming rate, motivating businesses of all sizes to strengthen their cybersecurity protocols and hire new talent. To learn more about the evolving area of cybersecurity, I spoke with Kelly Zelesnik, dean of the Division of Engineering, Business and Information Technology at Lorain County Community College, Douglas Huber, LCCC assistant professor of computer information systems, and Hikmat Chedid, LCCC professor and director of the Advanced Digital Forensics Institute. Here's what the group wanted you to know: Cyber attacks are more common than you think.  Zelesnik: Most companies don't want you to know if they have been breached. So every time you hear of confidential files being hacked, there are probably 50 to 100 other significant breaches that you don't hear about. Some industries more vulnerable than others. Huber: A really vulnerable area is in the manufacturing space. The industrial controls systems that control valves, tanks, manufacturing machines, rolling mills and nuclear power plants. Many of these were never developed with security in mind, and because of the expense, they are upgraded only in a 20- or 30-year cycle. There are more stringent cybersercurity policies on the way. Chedid: Cybersecurity insurance policies are already in effect, but new, more stringent policies are coming soon. These policies will help ensure that a company is conforming to some minimal security standards and provide a baseline of security. Chedid: Companies should also keep in mind that Europe has rich data privacy laws that are different from the U.S. That affects how cybersecurity solutions get architected and delivered, so you have to be compliant with those European standards. People with knowledge of that space can be very valuable in cybersecurity activities. Make sure your cybersecurity professionals have the right skills. Huber: Cybersecurity involves everything from auditing and policy development, all the way up to very specific technical skills, such as penetration testing and vulnerability testing. There are functions that are technically deep, but there is still a place for nontechnical people in the profession.